021 The Millennial Mindset

Lee Caraher
Lee Caraher

In this episode, I interview Ms. Lee Caraher, CEO of Double-Forte, a public relations and marketing services firm with offices in San Francisco, New York, and Boston. Lee has written a book entitled, Millennials & Management: The Essential Guide to Making it Work at Work. The book offers practical advice on managing the culture clashes and performance problems of the modern office, where millennials are a growing cohort.

Charles G. Chandler, Ph.D.
cchandler@AssumptionAnalysis.com

Reference:
Caraher L. 2015. Millennials & Management: The Essential Guide to Making it Work at Work. Brookline, MA: bibliomotion.

Amazon link:

 

020 Making Organizations Meaningful

IMG_0569[1]In this episode, I discuss meaningfulness in organizations. The theme of the upcoming annual meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM) for August 2016 (Anaheim, CA) is “Making Organizations Meaningful”, and we will try to get an early start on it here. Tune in for what may be a unique take on this topic. I hope to report on the actual AOM conference at a later date.

Charles G. Chandler, Ph.D.
cchandler@AssumptionAnalysis.com

 

019 Does “shared value” reinvent capitalism?

IMG_0564[1]
In this episode, I take a look at the idea of “shared value”, introduced by Michael Porter and Mark Kramer in 2011, and consider whether it has lived up to its original promise, that is, to reinvent capitalism.

Charles G. Chandler, Ph.D.
cchandler@AssumptionAnalysis.com

References:
1. Porter M. & Kramer M. 2011. “Creating Shared Value”. Harvard Business Review, January-February 2011, pp.63-77.

2. Porter M. et.al. “Measuring Shared Value”. FSG, Inc. [no date].

3. Denning S. “Why Shared Value Can’t Fix Capitalism”. Forbes, Dec. 20, 2011.

 

018 Is a paradigm shift underway in management thought?

IMG_0556[1]In this episode, I consider whether a paradigm shift is underway in management thought. The original inspiration for this question came from a couple of articles that Steve Denning wrote in Forbes, during the period 2011-2012. The traditional management model has roots in Taylorism (1911).  I discuss the differences between traditional management (based on Taylorism, the goal model, and other influences) and Denning’s “Radical Management”. I also suggest that some ideas from this podcast series can be rolled into a new approach I am calling “Management by Effectiveness” [you can hear about it for the first time]. Please tune in to find out what form a paradigm shift might take, and whether or not it is happening.

Charles G. Chandler, Ph.D.
cchandler@AssumptionAnalysis.com

References:
1. Denning, Steven  2012. “Don’t miss the paradigm shift in management…it’s happening”. Forbes (on-line), October 31, 2012.

2. Denning, Steven 2011. “The Five Big Surprises of Radical Management”. Forbes (on-line), July 8, 2011.

3. Taylor, F.W. 1911. The Principles of Scientific Management. Dover Publications: Mineola, NY (1998 edition).